Education is everything

We seek to bring out the best in each of our students

Summer Assignments


Departments

Mathematics Led by Kate Grayeb

Integrated Algebra Lab Kate Grayeb

The hands-on Math Lab covers strategies, techniques, and technologies necessary to solve and communicate solutions to real life situations. Problem solving strategies such as modeling and simulation are developed. The Math Lab incorporates current computer and calculator technologies, and other creative methods to communicate results. Connections between math and engineering are emphasized throughout the course.

Algebra 1 James DiNello

This course includes an understanding of real numbers using symbolic, graphic, and numeric representations and the use of scatter plot and functions to model data. Tables, graphs, verbal rules, and symbolic rules to describe linear, quadratic, rational, and exponential functions are covered extensively. The use of algebra to develop formulas for geometric relationships using slope, midpoint, and distance formula is introduced. Connections between math and engineering are emphasized throughout the course.

Algebra 2 James DiNello/Kate Grayeb

This course includes the use of multiple representations in studying polynomial, rational, radical and logarithmic functions. Matrices and complex numbers are introduced. A function of two variables in the concrete context of linear programming is introduced. Geometric models for trigonometric relationships are also utilized. Connections between math and engineering are emphasized throughout the course.

Geometry Nicole Silenok

This course develops an understanding of the structure and concepts of the Euclidean Plane Geometry and establishes the tools of geometry – methods of reasoning, proof construction, the coordinate plane, and types of measurement. It also focuses on properties and application of lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, similarity, right triangle trigonometry, and circles. Connections between math and engineering are emphasized throughout the course.

Pre-Calculus Taylor Bacon

The course topics include college algebra, advanced trigonometry, and analytic geometry of two and three dimensions. Students experience a thorough analysis of all elementary functions and curve sketching. Selected discrete mathematics topics including normal probability distributions, non-linear regression, and hypothesis testing are explored. Practices with proofs such as mathematical induction are included. Experience with graphing calculators is incorporated. Connections between math and engineering are emphasized throughout the course.

Calculus Taylor Bacon

This course employs a combination of classroom instruction and projects, and topics include limits and continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, differential equations and mathematical modeling

STEM Mathematics Nicole Silenok

This is a study of mathematical methods that are typically used in science, engineering, business, and industry with a review of essential concepts from Algebra 2 and Pre-Calculus. Students will work on application problems which include trigonometry, systems of linear equations, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic function basics to mathematically model problems and derive solutions with emphasis on the use of technology and other tools.


Science Led by Dr. Michael Fromerth

The University High School science curriculum prepares students for success in college programs and careers in the sciences and engineering. In addition to our honors curriculum, students have the opportunity to earn college credits through AP course offerings, as well as our partnerships with the University of Hartford and the University of Connecticut. Students can design and perform independent research while satisfying their capstone graduation requirement.

Conceptual Physics Kathy Lai-Hipp/Kelly Merlo

Conceptual Physics introduces students to the rich environment of the physical world without reliance on advanced mathematical concepts. The scientific method, atomic structure, properties of matter, heat, energy forms and transformations, cycles of matter, electricity, magnetism and global interdependence will be addressed. Course work will include investigative laboratory work to verify scientific principles. Students will apply what they learn to the real world by conducting investigations as well as formulating and testing their own hypotheses.

Biology Stephen Harbanuk

This is an introductory course designed to present principles that govern living things and to better equip students to make logical decisions about biological problems of everyday life. Students are expected to use mathematics and science to demonstrate comprehension of concepts through the use of oral, written, lab, and computer skills. An in depth and rigorous treatment of the following topics is presented: scientific method and use of technology, chemical basis of life, organization of living things, diversity of life, genetics, ecology, population dynamics and evolution.

AP Biology Stephen Harbanuk

This course follows the curriculum studied at the University of Connecticut. The course is divided into two parts: Cells and Their Molecules and Animal Structure and Function. In order to fulfill CAPT requirements, our course will also include a brief study of population. Extensive laboratory work is required. Topics include: the chemistry of cells, foundations of organic chemistry, macromolecules, energy transformations and enzymes, eukaryotic cell organization, cell communication, chromosomes, DNA and the genetic code, genetic engineering, genetics of viruses and bacteria, vertebrate anatomy and body systems.

Chemistry Kelly Merlo/Dr. Michael Fromerth

This course presents a rigorous treatment of the principles of chemistry with an intense application of mathematics. A combination of inquiry laboratory investigations, class discussion, and application of theory is employed to present the following topics: scientific method, measurement, atomic structure, periodic table, formulas, stoichiometry, bonding, molecular geometry, phases of matter, gas laws, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction, chemical kinetics, and thermodynamics.

UCONN ECE Chemistry 1127/1128 Dr. Michael Fromerth

This is a college-level introductory chemistry course. The material presented in this course includes the following topics: structure of matter, states of matter, reaction types, equations and stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, descriptive chemistry, and experimental chemistry. This course includes laboratory sessions in addition to classes.

Physics Aaron Brown

This course is a study of mechanics, thermodynamics, wave motion (sound and light), electricity and magnetism, and quantum mechanics to prepare students for the pursuit of a science program at the college level. Students should take Pre-Calculus prior to or concurrent with Physics.

UCONN ECE Introduction to Oceanography Sharol Wilcoxen

Introduction to Marine Science covers the processes governing the geology, circulation, chemistry, and biological productivity of the world’s oceans. Emphasis is placed on the interactions and interrelationships between physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes that contribute to both the stability and the variability of the marine environment. The influence of humans on the stability and variability of the oceans is given particular attention.


Engineering Led by Dennis Obie

As a result of the rapid expansion of scientific knowledge during the second half of the twentieth century and the concurrent advances in a wide array of new technologies, there is an ever-increasing demand for skilled professionals in the engineering and technological fields. At UHSSE, students are given the opportunity to learn about career opportunities in engineering and to develop the skills needed to successfully pursue engineering at the college level. Goals Students will obtain the basic theoretical knowledge and skills to successfully pursue many engineering disciplines at the college level. Students will be introduced to: the design process, teamwork, project management, 3D solid modeling, prototyping, testing and evaluation, technical communication, programming, materials, methods of fabrication, control systems, statics, kinematics, and thermodynamics. Students will understand engineering principles and methodologies to demonstrate solutions to real world problems. Students will demonstrate their engineering knowledge in a senior capstone course.

PLTW Introduction to Engineering (IED) Susan Pedrick

The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards and technical documentation. Students use 3D solid modeling design software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems and learn how to document their work and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community.

PLTW Principles of Engineering (POE) Dennis Obie

This survey course of engineering exposes students to major concepts they’ll encounter in college engineering courses. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, documenting their work and communicating solutions to peers and members of the professional community. (Prerequisite: PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design)

Biotechnical Engineering Sharol Wilcoxen

The major focus of this course is to expose students to the diverse fields of biotechnology including biomedical engineering, molecular genetics, bioprocess engineering, and agricultural and environmental engineering. Lessons engage students in engineering design problems related to biomechanics, cardiovascular engineering, genetic engineering, agricultural biotechnology, tissue engineering, biomedical devices, forensics and bioethics. Students, usually at the 11th- and 12th-grade level, apply biological and engineering concepts to design materials and processes that directly measure, repair, improve and extend living systems. (Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering and Biology, or permission of instructor)

Architecture Aaron Brown

This is a semester-long course investigating historically significant architects and buildings and exploring various theories of the design process. Students apply knowledge within the scope of numerous design vignettes where they create a schematic design and proceed through design development. Students will employ model building and rendering skills to express and support their designs. Completed designs will be presented to professional architects for review. Students may take the fall (Principles of Architecture 1) and/or spring (Principles of Architecture 2) courses for credit. (Prerequisite: Geometry or Instructor consent)


English Led by Jennifer Todisco

English Learning Outcomes To increase students’ powers of expression, both in written and oral communication, in all subject areas of the curriculum and in a variety of styles and situations. To develop students’ abilities to engage tin critical examination of written works. To introduce students to w wide range of literary works and literary genres, styles and context through the study of the major classics of worlds and American literature as well as range of contemporary literature. To provide students with an understanding of and experience in using a variety of techniques for engaging in literary study and criticism, and to recognize the relationship between different literary works and literary styles. To develop an appreciation of the rich diversity of literature from around the world and during historical time periods. To engender in students a personal appreciation of literature as the basis for a life long enjoyment of reading and an interest in current literary developments. Social Studies Specific courses within the American Studies strands are designed to meet the graduation requirements for U.S. History and Civics

English 1

The framework for the English curriculum is based on a series of instructional goals and expected student outcomes in composition, reading, and speaking/listening skills. The course employs an interdisciplinary approach related to the school’s themes of science and engineering. This approach allows students to recognize that the skills learned in English class can be applied to all other disciplines. This course is designed to maximize vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension and proofreading skills in preparation for the PSAT and other standardized tests.

English 2

Students will read and respond to a combination of contemporary, classic, and self-selected titles. The course employs an interdisciplinary approach related to the school’s themes of science and engineering. Students will write persuasive essays, expository essays, including descriptive and explanatory, as well as a narrative or short story. Students will support ideas, opinions, and points of view with information from at least three sources, primary and secondary, which are credited accurately and ethically. Students will also study elements of fiction and non-fiction as well as the conventions of spelling, grammar, and usage. This course is designed to build on the skills of Honors Freshman English to maximize vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension and proofreading skills in preparation for the PSAT and other standardized tests.

AP Language and Composition Jennifer Todisco

The AP Language and Composition course cultivates the reading and writing skills that students need for college success and for intellectually responsible civic engagement. This course cultivates the rhetorical understanding and use of written language by directing students’ attention to writer/reader interactions in their reading and writing of various formal and informal genres. Generally an 11th/12th grade English course uniquely offered to sophomores who are identified as advanced in English.

Literature & Composition 1 Jennifer Todisco

Students will respond to a variety of contemporary and classic literary works in order to improve their reading and writing skills. They will be introduced to literary devices such as tone, metaphor and diction. The course enriches the students’ understanding of literature by requiring them to formulate and defend multiple responses to texts. This course is designed to maximize vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension and proofreading skills in preparation for the SAT and other standardized tests.

UCONN ECE American Studies Jennifer Todisco

Taught by University of Connecticut Adjunct Faculty, this course utilizes a multi-disciplinary inquiry into the diversity of American societies and cultures, bringing together source material from literature, history, anthropology, art history, media studies, economics, and more. Students will examine diverse topics, such as immigration, transatlantic slavery, American Victorianism, industrial capitalism, the New Deal, the Cold War, the social movements of the 1960s, or concepts of youth. With a grade of B- or higher, students will earn three University of Connecticut college credits.

Literature & Composition 2 Phillip Allard

Students will analyze a variety of contemporary and classic literary works to extend critical reading and writing skills, and will be encouraged to use more sophisticated literary and rhetorical devices in their writing. Using foundational literature, students will focus on broadening and honing their own writing styles, in preparation for post-secondary education. In addition, this course is designed to maximize vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension and proofreading skills in preparation for the SAT and other standardized tests.

UCONN ECE English 1011: Seminar in Writing Through Literature Phillip Allard

Taught by University of Connecticut Adjunct Faculty, this academic writing course focuses on world literature as the intellectual foundation of deeper thought. Assignments emphasize interpretation, argumentation, and reflection. Students learn improved writing skills through constant revision of formal assignments for better clarity, grammar, mechanics and style. This is an intensive reading and writing course earning four college credits from the University of Connecticut, if the student earns a B-. Students are admitted by permission of instructor and guidance only.


Spanish Led by Elizabeth Benfield

A global perspective has become an essential component of effectively preparing students to become life-long learners, to pursue their personal and professional development, and to contribute to our technological society. Knowledge of and the ability to use other languages is a basic tool for engaging with the expanding global arena that effects the daily life of Americans and all people around the world. University High School requires students take at least three years of Spanish. Spanish is rapidly becoming a second-language throughout the United States and is particularly significant in Hartford since at least one-third of Hartford residents are native Spanish speakers or children of native Spanish speakers. Admission to most colleges and universities requires that students study at least two years of a foreign language, but three years is preferred. For this reason, it is required that all University High School students take at least three years of Spanish. World Language Learning Outcomes Students will engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, express feelings and exchange opinions using the Spanish language. Students will understand and interpret spoken and written Spanish on a variety of topics and will communicate information, concepts and ideas on a variety of topics both in oral and written Spanish. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the range of Spanish cultures in Europe, Latin America and the United States. Students will reinforce and expand the knowledge acquired in the Global Studies curricula through their study of Spanish language. Since many schools in the Greater Hartford area require language study prior to high school, it is expected the many students will begin their Spanish classes at the intermediate level. Advance Spanish classes will be offered for students with demonstrated proficiency in both written and oral Spanish. These classes are particularly recommended for native Spanish speakers. The focus of the advance Spanish classed is the study and interpretation of Spanish literature and the development of critical analysis using the Spanish language. Students who qualify have the option of taking courses in Spanish literature at the University of Hartford.

Spanish 1

This is an introductory course in which students will focus on the skills they need to create language for communication, to gain knowledge of other cultures, connect with other disciplines, make comparisons with their own language and culture, and understand multicultural communities at home and around the world. Through the introduction of a variety of topics, functions, and grammatical structures, students will develop emerging proficiency in the target language

Spanish 2 Elizabeth Benfield

This course builds on concepts studied in Level I and continues to develop skills they need to create language for communication, to gain knowledge of other cultures, connect with other disciplines, make comparisons with their own language and culture, and understand multicultural communities at home and around the world. Through the continued study of a variety of topics, functions, and grammatical structures, students will develop further proficiency in the target language.

Spanish 3 Jessica Serrano

This course builds on concepts studied in Level II and advances the skills needed to create language for communication, to gain knowledge of other cultures, connect with other disciplines, make comparisons with their own language and culture, and understand multicultural communities at home and around the world. Through the advanced study of a variety of topics, functions, and grammatical structures, students will gain the essential tools to develop mastery in the target language.

Spanish 4 Jessica Serrano

This course builds on concepts studied in Level III and advances the skills needed to create language for communication, to gain knowledge of other cultures, connect with other disciplines, make comparisons with their own language and culture, and understand multicultural communities at home and around the world. Through the advanced study of a variety of topics, functions, and grammatical structures, students will gain the essential tools to reach mastery in the target language.


Social Studies Led by Jon Bevans

Social studies is the integrated study of history and the social sciences to promote civic competence. Our social studies program is dedicated to providing a course of study that encourages our students to become informed and active citizens. We are committed to providing meaningful and challenging learning experiences for our students that are connected to important social studies content and themes. In addition, we are committed to making meaningful connections with the magnet theme of science and engineering. Our aim is to provide students with opportunities to think and communicate in ways that will enable them to develop a working knowledge of social studies content, and to identify, understand and work to solve problems in their lives and their world. Our goal is to prepare our students to be college ready as well as to be active citizens in a culturally diverse, rapidly changing, and interdependent world. Department Goals Students will gain knowledge of United States history, world history, civics and government, and geography. Students will apply geographic knowledge, skill and concepts to understanding human behavior in relations to the physical and cultural environment. Students will acquire an understanding of how ideals, principles and practices of citizenship have emerged over time and across cultures. Students will develop skills in chronological organization of events, the ability to read and interpret primary and secondary historical documents, and to compare and contrast trends across time and place. Students will analyze the historical roots of current world problems including the complexity of relations and conflicts among nations in our increasingly interdependent world. Students will employ the concepts learned in social studies to better understand the development and advancement of scientific and technological discoveries and innovations. Students will demonstrate knowledge of how laws are made and how they regulate the relationship between individual rights and societal needs.

Civics Heidi Scanlon/Jon Bevans

Civics provides the foundation for students’ active and informed participation in our society, and for an understanding of the interaction between ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship. This course examines the historical roots of American democracy, the U.S. Constitution, how our government functions, the political process, and civic rights and responsibilities.

Geography Heidi Scanlon/Jon Bevans

This course will study the five themes of geography and apply them to regions of the earth. The regions studied include Canada and the United States, Latin America, Africa, Europe and Russia, Monsoon Asia, Central and Southwest Asia, and Oceania. Students will be challenged to make connections between physical and human characteristics of geography, regions and cultures, and to develop critical thinking skills (i.e. compare, contrast, analyze, or synthesize). In addition, students will explore current issues which may affect the world as a whole.

United States History Joseph Miller

American History investigates the forces that shape the political, social and economic institutions of modern America. An in-depth exploration of the United States from the late 19th century to today, including contemporary issues and the place of the United States in the global world, will provide the framework for study. Like historians, students will engage in critical readings of a variety of sources, learn to consider multiple perspectives, decide which facts matter and why, and ask thoughtful questions to spark further historical investigation.

UCONN ECE United States History Jon Bevans

International Studies Jon Bevans

International Studies emphasizes in-depth examination of growth of global interconnections. Students study the traditional cultures and societies of peoples in a range of world areas including Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and South and East Asia; the impact of European colonialism on changing the social, economic and belief structures of traditional societies; and the emergence of regional technology and the advancement of engineering across cultures.


Art Led by Guy Richters

The philosophy of the UHSSE Visual Art Department is to teach students the ability to see and know the world around them through personal artistic expression. Our commitment is not only to make connections between visual art and science and engineering, but to also create a visual dialogue between students and their environment. The arts inspire us to create and gives us ownership of our own perspectives. The curriculum emphasizes the artistic process allowing the product to be a visual expression propelling us forward. Students are presented with challenges to nurture abstract problem solving. We seek to cultivate creativity in all of our students. We promote an environment focused on community and self-reflection. We allow students to explore by giving them the skills necessary to express their own thoughts and ideas through an experience based learning process. Goals Students will learn to define art using The Critical Method process to evaluate the quality of their works Students will explore the use of Elements of Art and Principles of Design to organize their works Students will demonstrate the use of various art media Students will explore and discuss the context of art throughout history Students will understand how the artistic process can be applied to all other academic disciplines

Foundations of Art Guy Richters

This is an intermediate level course specializing in various drawing, painting, and media techniques. Emphasis is placed on fine art through successful rendering of still life, landscapes, and the study of human form. Art history is incorporated into the curriculum. Media include; pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, pastel, watercolors, and paint. This course also focuses on the Elements of Art and Principles of Design and how they relate to one another within a successful composition.

Graphic Design Guy Richters

Graphic Design: Is an introductory art course focusing on the study of the Elements of Art (line, shape/form, color, texture/pattern, space) and the Principles of Design (balance, rhythm, unity, contrast, emphasis). The course will challenge students to understand how these ideas relate to one another within a successful design. Graphic Design is the applied art of arranging images and text to communicate meaning. Graphic Design is also considered visual arts which are linear in character, such as drawing, engraving, and other forms of printmaking. This course will focus on the studio application of these Elements of Art and Principles of Design though various lessons. These hands on activities will help students to understand different ways of expressing meaning through visual design.


Physical Education and Health

Physical Education Matt Shea

This course applies the principles of human movement, physical activity, fitness, responsible behavior, respect for differences, and the benefits of physical activity. The students will analyze the principles of training; evaluate the role of exercise and other factors in maintaining fitness, and practice in ways that are appropriate for learning new skills or participating in sports.Students will demonstrate an understanding of fitness components and apply them to construction of healthy lifestyles through goal setting activities. Students will focus on writing their own personal fitness plan and track their own performances throughout the semester.Units include: physical fitness, weight training, fitness games, flag football, basketball, floor hockey, eagle ball, pickle ball, volleyball and indoor soccer.

Health Jason Riccitelli

Health Education provides students with an opportunity to understand and develop attitudes and skills for decision making that will benefit them and improve their wellness. Students will study in depth ways to improve social, emotional, mental, and physical health. This course covers topics in mental health, substance abuse, HIV infection, sexually transmitted diseases, violence prevention, personal safety, and conflict resolution.